DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Tips, techniques and tutorials about creation tools.

Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby lydia02 » Sun, 17Aug20 23:10

MaxCarna wrote:Hi Lydia02,

I would guess the main question is the source of light.

In your scene we see a direct strong source, maybe is your camera headlamp. I, at least, always select the camera and in the camera tab, turn the headlamp to off, default is auto. In the target model you can see that the main light on the face is coming from the left.

On the Daz Studio User Guide, section 7.6 is talk about the 3 Point Rig, you can google it also. It uses 3 light sources: key light, fill light and rim light. Is a nice set to begin. You can play with the temperature config on the light's panel, from cold to warm to see the results.

About the model, you can add makeup and change the color on the Materials on Smart content. Some vendors sell the HD add on to his model

She is not touching the ground.

I can't say if they don't use photoshop but you can come closer using Daz only.


Thanks for your reply. Still learning lighting but also was struggling trying to do model and bathroom set in one render. The bathroom set is a very small 3d set. Kept going outside of the set in trying to place the cameras and having to set cameras closer to the target area than I wanted to stay within the set. Will probably do models separate so I can reuse standard sets and just put a layered model into the scene. The bathroom set does look dark so tried to light it. What I posted was actually a light package to avoid the headache that manually placing the cameras was giving me. It lighted the model but overlit various bits of wall. The light package read me mostly covers a summary of the product and not a process or how to adjust the results of using said package. Will need to practice with it to figure out how to address. Didn't notice the model was above the floor until after the render was completed. Good point with the model look. Changing some of the model options will bring me closer to the vendor image. For example, the hair texture is darker than what I had tried. Makeup seems a bit odd as eyeshadow and blush are lumped together in choices that only show the eyeshadow. Appears that the choices with less eyeshadow also come with a lighter apply of blush. The texture option model ends up looking rather different once it gets rendered. Still guessing there's a good bit of photoshop involved. Is there a low priced version of photoshop available? I've only got gimp and haven't used it beyond mostly resizing
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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby MaxCarna » Sun, 17Aug20 23:51

I am part of a team of a game that is already released to public, in this one I rendered all the characters along with the background in many angles.

But I'm working on a new one and also thinking to render the background once and the charactes multiple times in different poses, just mixing then after. It will be more productive. I'm also planning to use fixed cameras, instead of changing the angle for every scene, this caused the experience that the user's head was jumping from one scene to another.

I'm facing a big problem using a light package called Ultra Genesis Iray Box Lights. I opened a help ticket on Daz Help Center but they didn't solved it yet. I'm thinking to only use Daz native lights from now on: distant lights, spot or linear.

Tlaero is part of the professional team, I'm just a student, the things she said are very relevant, but in my experience Iray was much faster then 3Delight to render. Even if Iray was slower I recommend to use it because it is much more modern and all the products walk towards it.

To convert any surface to Iray, just apply the Iray Uber Shadder on it, I will preserve all sets, but will work better on render time.

Lipsticks are usually in the lips paste, separate from the makeup. The makeup options are quite limited, if you are going to use another character's makeup, you will need to change the entire skin color.
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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby lydia02 » Mon, 17Aug21 00:00

tlaero wrote:Hey Lydia,

I suggest a few things:
1) Start by rendering just the model (leave the background plain). This will dramatically speed up your render time and let you experiment more quickly. The reflective walls of the shower slowed down the render quite a bit. Experiment with just the character, get comfortable with her, and then add in backgrounds and other things.

2) Focus your initial efforts on the face. Humans (even men) are hardwired for faces and will notice them before bodies. Men might spend more time looking at breasts and hips, etc, but they will see the face first. In the face, the biggest difference between your render and the professional one is that in the pro one, she's looking directly at the camera, as though she's interested in you, the person looking at her. In yours she's looking up and to camera left, not "making eye contact" as it were. The result is that the pro one seems more sexually enticing, even though yours is the same model, in a towel, and almost showing some nipple.

3) There are two rendering technologies. "3Dlight" and "iRay." Which are you using for your render? I suspect you're on 3Dlight and the pro one is on iRay. IRay renders require a better 3d card in your computer and take longer to render (some of Mortze's renders in Finding Miranda took 4 hours!) but can have better results.

I hope you keep at it.

Tlaero



Thanks for the response.

1. Wanted to get some practice with model & set together so I could see how these renders would fit into my new game. One of my questions I was looking to answer for myself was what sort of quality/time trade off there might be between rendering the model separate vs scene and model together. Moving around in a small 3d set made it very difficult to light. I couldn't get the lighting I wanted so used a package light set that I'm not very familiar with yet. Will be going back to practice with the solo model as well like you suggest.

2. Nice insight into what makes the image work. For a posed photo it works well. The effect is certainly alluring. Was thinking of the render along the context of the game content. If she's say getting ready for the day, would it seem odd to have her looking into the camera? This was the context I was thinking of when I chose the pose. She'd be going about getting ready without really a central focus.

3. The image was done in Iray with a geforce gtx 1080ti. The scene took some 20 minutes or so to render. A large difference from the solo model render times I've been working with but glad it wasn't anywhere near 4 hours. Are there particular settings one uses for a photo quality render? Youtube vids mention the render quality setting, max sample settings, and overall time but mostly in the context of reducing the render time. My goal is to create quality renders like those used in games for my own games. Will I be able to achieve similar results without using photoshop?

Thank you for your encouragement.
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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby lydia02 » Mon, 17Aug21 00:03

MaxCarna wrote:I am part of a team of a game that is already released to public, in this one I rendered all the characters along with the background in many angles.

But I'm working on a new one and also thinking to render the background once and the charactes multiple times in different poses, just mixing then after. It will be more productive. I'm also planning to use fixed cameras, instead of changing the angle for every scene, this caused the experience that the user's head was jumping from one scene to another.


Still new so trying out various ways so that I have some sense of what my options are. Leaning toward rendering the set once as you describe or even just using photos and putting the model(s) in layers. Fixed cameras sound interesting. Is that similar to saving a scene? How do you allow for the different placement for the model(s)? Sounds like it could be a very useful setup.

I'm facing a big problem using a light package called Ultra Genesis Iray Box Lights. I opened a help ticket on Daz Help Center but they didn't solved it yet. I'm thinking to only use Daz native lights from now on: distant lights, spot or linear.


Hopefully they can find a suitable answer. While individual placement is more work, it does seem to offer more control of the results. Just trying out different options myself. Wasn't able to get good lighting in the small 3d bathroom set so tried a package light system to see what it could do. Mixed results. Will still be working through youtube posts to pick up tips and develop a system that works for me.

Tlaero is part of the professional team, I'm just a student, the things she said are very relevant, but in my experience Iray was much faster then 3Delight to render. Even if Iray was slower I recommend to use it because it is much more modern and all the products walk towards it.

To convert any surface to Iray, just apply the Iray Uber Shadder on it, I will preserve all sets, but will work better on render time.


Pretty much a total daz newbie. Just thrilled to get help and learn from people kind enough to share their wisdom. Looking to use my renders for my games so especially glad to hear from people using daz for the same allocation. Used a package light so can't say what the settings were. But have done all my renders in iray.

Lipsticks are usually in the lips paste, separate from the makeup. The makeup options are quite limited, if you are going to use another character's makeup, you will need to change the entire skin color.


Sorry for the confusion. I was only trying to reference the eyeshadow and blush. What I was trying to say was that the sample image provided only shows eyeshadow options. Blush appears to be included in the selection of the eyeshadow though. The heavier the eyeshadow application, the more blush that seems to appear. Lipstick is indeed under its own option. I've only used the makeup options that are included with the model. Mostly trying to create a render similar to the ones a vendor posts when they are selling their model. Gives me something to imitate as I learn.
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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby MaxCarna » Mon, 17Aug21 05:52

lydia02 wrote:Still new so trying out various ways so that I have some sense of what my options are. Leaning toward rendering the set once as you describe or even just using photos and putting the model(s) in layers. Fixed cameras sound interesting. Is that similar to saving a scene? How do you allow for the different placement for the model(s)? Sounds like it could be a very useful setup.


When you create a new camera it will become part of the scene, configurations and location will be preserved. You can create something like "Front_Door_Cam", "Couch_Cam"... with just one .duf file you can create multiple renders, just selecting the camera to render.

You can set a room, put all the lights as you want and then render. After that, put the model in the place it should be, delete everything but the model and the lights and render. In this way the environment and the model will be coherent about reflexes. I personally don't like environments of a real photo with the model ahead. They hardly match.

lydia02 wrote:Will still be working through youtube posts to pick up tips and develop a system that works for me.


For the Daz native lights make a difference in the set you have two options: use a really big number of lumens, like 100,000 , 150,000... or changing the light intensity config. Be default it will get 200% maximum that is almost nothing. Click on to show the menu of options (the gear symbol in the side of the heart), and go to Parameter Settings. Put the max on 200,000% for example, then you can freely slide the select and see some actually changes.

lydia02 wrote:Lipstick is indeed under its own option. I've only used the makeup options that are included with the model. Mostly trying to create a render similar to the ones a vendor posts when they are selling their model. Gives me something to imitate as I learn.


I mentioned the lipstick because it was the major difference between the vendor image (strong red) and yours. Men usually can't distinguish blush :)

lydia02 wrote:If she's say getting ready for the day, would it seem odd to have her looking into the camera?


Just an intrusion, I think you can create a reference image with her looking at the camera, until you get to the point where you are satisfied. After that you begin to apply natural poses from day to day to make your scenes. A direct look in the middle of the game might also be a good idea.
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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby Mortze » Mon, 17Aug21 17:56

I think that the best advice I could give someone starting with DAZ that intends to render pretty pictures like the promotional one you showed is to work and work, and learn and learn about lighting.
That promotional picture has a punch because the lighting is well done. Period.
The pose, the camera angle, the eyes looking at the camera, all is secondary to lighting. Even the best textures, skin, clothes, metals, look bad under poor lighting. But take a carrot, put in on a table, and with the proper lighting you'll make art.

And one of the best advice I could give you is to drop Preset lights products. You have to understand how light works, how to pose spotlights, how to create shadows. Preset lights don't teach you anything. They are just that, presets, posed lights. It doesn't matter if those lights are nice, the point is that most of the times you don't understand the presets parameters, it won't be 100% what you're looking for and worse, you won't be able to duplicate them.
Give a man a fish he'll eat today. Teach him how to go fishing and he'll eat the rest of his life. Right?

I don't want to sound harsh but you won't be able to make a picture like that promotional one right away! The artist that made that picture surely has many many hours of training and learning. And I bet his early renders sucked, as did mine.
2 days ago I made 2 pictures for the weekly perk at Patr.eon. I didn't like one of them, I didn't get the lights right. I didn't even mentioned it to Tlaero.

Back to the point, the lighting in your picture isn't what you're looking for. You're not happy with the result, and because you used a Preset you can't probably explain why, and correct what went wrong.
I have lots of Presets lights in my content library. I don't recall ever using one.
The only exception goes for HDRI environment lighting. That's when you use a real picture that forms a sphere around your scene and it emits light into the scene like if it was real. That's really useful for outdoors BECAUSE of the background picture (a garden, a park, a city) it provides. If you already have a background and your scene is outdoors just use the native IRAy Dome or Sun-Sky lighting (you find them in Environment in the Render Settings Pane).
+90% of the time I use spotlights and pointlights. The other 5% I use Emissive lights, and the rest 5% I use HDRI Environments.

Rendering time in IRay is a pain in the ass but that's the price for photorealistic renders. The alternative price is investing gold ingots in dozens of GPUs and run dedicated rendering servers like Pixar does.
There are little tricks we learn from time to time to reduce a little bit the amount of rendering time. But it's more 3D engineering and physics than art.

How to understand the lighting? How to set the proper lighting in the scene? Well, luckily IRay is photorealistic meaning that lights behaves in the software close to how it behaves in real life.
Look at a real small bathroom like that one you rendered. How is the light set normally in a real one? Probably with a lamp on the ceiling, and perhaps one in the mirror cabinet. There, 2 light sources minimum.
Put a spotlight in the ceiling, another one where the cabinet should be. Learn to work with the parameters like Lumen, Temperature, Light Geometry. It's easier that you think.
Press render.

If you think the face or part of the body is too dark then you can always cheat. That's the wonder you don't get in real life but you get in a 3D software. Put a cheat light closer to the figure and render again.

Trial and error. Trial and error. Eventually you'll get somewhere you feel proud. Welcome to 3D Art!

Again. Seriously. Don't waste money on Light Presets.
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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby tlaero » Sun, 17Aug27 04:03

lydia02 wrote:1. Wanted to get some practice with model & set together so I could see how these renders would fit into my new game. One of my questions I was looking to answer for myself was what sort of quality/time trade off there might be between rendering the model separate vs scene and model together. Moving around in a small 3d set made it very difficult to light. I couldn't get the lighting I wanted so used a package light set that I'm not very familiar with yet. Will be going back to practice with the solo model as well like you suggest.

2. Nice insight into what makes the image work. For a posed photo it works well. The effect is certainly alluring. Was thinking of the render along the context of the game content. If she's say getting ready for the day, would it seem odd to have her looking into the camera? This was the context I was thinking of when I chose the pose. She'd be going about getting ready without really a central focus.


Just to make sure you realize, most building models let you turn on and off individual walls. That's the trick for having cameras in natural places in small rooms. You pull the camera back into the wall and then hide the wall between the character and the camera.

As for facial expressions and eyes, as a developer and player, that's what I notice first. Mortze is a fantastic artist. Listen to everything he says about lighting, etc. But I disagree with his priority ranking. A well lit scene with poor facial expressions is less good than a poorly lit scene with great facial expressions. Mortze isn't wrong, it's just that his facial expressions are some of the best in the genre, so he's taking his extreme skill for granted. Yeah, if you're already as good as him, lighting is the most important thing. If you're mortal, though, character expressivity wins. (-:

As for a picture of someone just getting out of the shower and about to go about her day, consider having her look into the mirror and put the camera behind the mirror. That way it's natural for her to look at the camera even though she's not really looking at the camera.

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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby GDS » Sun, 17Sep03 17:35

tlaero wrote:Just to make sure you realize, most building models let you turn on and off individual walls. That's the trick for having cameras in natural places in small rooms. You pull the camera back into the wall and then hide the wall between the character and the camera.
Tlaero

Just to add on this tip: If you cant change the wall(sometimes a lot of walls are linked together) change the camera Frame, that way you can get a bigger field of view
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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby lydia02 » Sun, 17Sep03 23:17

MaxCarna wrote:When you create a new camera it will become part of the scene, configurations and location will be preserved. You can create something like "Front_Door_Cam", "Couch_Cam"... with just one .duf file you can create multiple renders, just selecting the camera to render.


I realize I can save a scene and then add or delete lights based on results. What I was wondering is if it would be useful to create a default lighting setup? Or would different model location & backgrounds make the defaults pointless?

You can set a room, put all the lights as you want and then render. After that, put the model in the place it should be, delete everything but the model and the lights and render. In this way the environment and the model will be coherent about reflexes. I personally don't like environments of a real photo with the model ahead. They hardly match.


Was just thinking photos will be easier to find then 3d sets. They will have a different look but already have a long/expensive wish list of assets for the figures.

For the Daz native lights make a difference in the set you have two options: use a really big number of lumens, like 100,000 , 150,000... or changing the light intensity config. Be default it will get 200% maximum that is almost nothing. Click on to show the menu of options (the gear symbol in the side of the heart), and go to Parameter Settings. Put the max on 200,000% for example, then you can freely slide the select and see some actually changes.


Thanks. I'll try this out and probably have some questions.

Just an intrusion, I think you can create a reference image with her looking at the camera, until you get to the point where you are satisfied. After that you begin to apply natural poses from day to day to make your scenes. A direct look in the middle of the game might also be a good idea.


Have been playing around with pov and a good view of her face plus expressions does really add to the look as tlareo shared. Only have expressions that came with the bundle sets so sorting through these to find some good ones. Thinking I'll pretty much stay on character as suggested unless there's a character spying on the girl in the shower. Then point of reference changes between spy and subject.
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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby lydia02 » Sun, 17Sep03 23:23

Mortze wrote:I think that the best advice I could give someone starting with DAZ that intends to render pretty pictures like the promotional one you showed is to work and work, and learn and learn about lighting.
That promotional picture has a punch because the lighting is well done. Period.
The pose, the camera angle, the eyes looking at the camera, all is secondary to lighting. Even the best textures, skin, clothes, metals, look bad under poor lighting. But take a carrot, put in on a table, and with the proper lighting you'll make art.

And one of the best advice I could give you is to drop Preset lights products. You have to understand how light works, how to pose spotlights, how to create shadows. Preset lights don't teach you anything. They are just that, presets, posed lights. It doesn't matter if those lights are nice, the point is that most of the times you don't understand the presets parameters, it won't be 100% what you're looking for and worse, you won't be able to duplicate them.
Give a man a fish he'll eat today. Teach him how to go fishing and he'll eat the rest of his life. Right?

I don't want to sound harsh but you won't be able to make a picture like that promotional one right away! The artist that made that picture surely has many many hours of training and learning. And I bet his early renders sucked, as did mine.
2 days ago I made 2 pictures for the weekly perk at Patr.eon. I didn't like one of them, I didn't get the lights right. I didn't even mentioned it to Tlaero.

Back to the point, the lighting in your picture isn't what you're looking for. You're not happy with the result, and because you used a Preset you can't probably explain why, and correct what went wrong.
I have lots of Presets lights in my content library. I don't recall ever using one.
The only exception goes for HDRI environment lighting. That's when you use a real picture that forms a sphere around your scene and it emits light into the scene like if it was real. That's really useful for outdoors BECAUSE of the background picture (a garden, a park, a city) it provides. If you already have a background and your scene is outdoors just use the native IRAy Dome or Sun-Sky lighting (you find them in Environment in the Render Settings Pane).
+90% of the time I use spotlights and pointlights. The other 5% I use Emissive lights, and the rest 5% I use HDRI Environments.

Rendering time in IRay is a pain in the ass but that's the price for photorealistic renders. The alternative price is investing gold ingots in dozens of GPUs and run dedicated rendering servers like Pixar does.
There are little tricks we learn from time to time to reduce a little bit the amount of rendering time. But it's more 3D engineering and physics than art.

How to understand the lighting? How to set the proper lighting in the scene? Well, luckily IRay is photorealistic meaning that lights behaves in the software close to how it behaves in real life.
Look at a real small bathroom like that one you rendered. How is the light set normally in a real one? Probably with a lamp on the ceiling, and perhaps one in the mirror cabinet. There, 2 light sources minimum.
Put a spotlight in the ceiling, another one where the cabinet should be. Learn to work with the parameters like Lumen, Temperature, Light Geometry. It's easier that you think.
Press render.

If you think the face or part of the body is too dark then you can always cheat. That's the wonder you don't get in real life but you get in a 3D software. Put a cheat light closer to the figure and render again.

Trial and error. Trial and error. Eventually you'll get somewhere you feel proud. Welcome to 3D Art!

Again. Seriously. Don't waste money on Light Presets.


Thanks for the words of wisdom. Was hoping that a light package would do the heavy lifting of lighting for me and I could work on other elements. Back to the basics of figuring out just what the various options do and how to get the look that I want.
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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby lydia02 » Sun, 17Sep03 23:35

tlaero wrote:Just to make sure you realize, most building models let you turn on and off individual walls. That's the trick for having cameras in natural places in small rooms. You pull the camera back into the wall and then hide the wall between the character and the camera.

As for facial expressions and eyes, as a developer and player, that's what I notice first. Mortze is a fantastic artist. Listen to everything he says about lighting, etc. But I disagree with his priority ranking. A well lit scene with poor facial expressions is less good than a poorly lit scene with great facial expressions. Mortze isn't wrong, it's just that his facial expressions are some of the best in the genre, so he's taking his extreme skill for granted. Yeah, if you're already as good as him, lighting is the most important thing. If you're mortal, though, character expressivity wins. (-:

As for a picture of someone just getting out of the shower and about to go about her day, consider having her look into the mirror and put the camera behind the mirror. That way it's natural for her to look at the camera even though she's not really looking at the camera.

Tlaero


Thanks. Good to know. Will have to play with the set and get it more manageable. Everything I've heard about Daz is lighting. Totally seeing a big difference in practice with shots that give a good look at the model's face. Working through finding some good expressions as I don't have many and haven't used them before. Also putting in some light makeup. All several steps closer to a render that I want for my game. As I mentioned in prior post, been practicing with camera on model. Thoughts for someone spying on her in the shower so the pov would change between the two. Otherwise the pov that you suggested is definately a better look.
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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby lydia02 » Sun, 17Sep03 23:38

GDS wrote:
tlaero wrote:Just to make sure you realize, most building models let you turn on and off individual walls. That's the trick for having cameras in natural places in small rooms. You pull the camera back into the wall and then hide the wall between the character and the camera.
Tlaero

Just to add on this tip: If you cant change the wall(sometimes a lot of walls are linked together) change the camera Frame, that way you can get a bigger field of view


Will probably come across both version so good to know. Thanks.
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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby tlaero » Mon, 17Sep04 17:38

lydia02 wrote:Was just thinking photos will be easier to find then 3d sets. They will have a different look but already have a long/expensive wish list of assets for the figures.


My first 4 games were that way. It can definitely work and is a fine way to start. The challenges you'll face are these:

1) Camera angle is a storytelling technique. Sometimes a changing emotion is partially expressed through a change in camera angle. When you have stock photos for your backgrounds, you're limited on being able to do this.

2) Similarly, sex scenes tend to work better in 3rd person than 1st. Especially kissing. The camera angle switch to 3rd person is harder with a photo background.

3) It's much harder to place the characters in the scene. Consider them sitting at a table where the table obscures their legs. Or, consider them having sex on the stairs while leaning over the railing. (The inability to do that particular one frustrated me when we were using photos.)

4) Shadows will never work. You won't be able to cast shadows onto the background, etc.

On the plus side, you don't have to buy a bunch of 3D buildings and sets, nor do you have to spend the time lighting them. I think you'd be totally fine doing photo backgrounds for your first game and work you way up to fully rendered stuff. It's kind of a "crawl, walk, run" concept. And it's MUCH better to finish a game with photo backgrounds than to get overwhelmed trying to do everything on your first try and maybe give up.

I'm glad to hear the expressions are working out for you.

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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby MaxCarna » Mon, 17Sep04 23:49

tlaero wrote:
lydia02 wrote:Was just thinking photos will be easier to find then 3d sets. They will have a different look but already have a long/expensive wish list of assets for the figures.


My first 4 games were that way. It can definitely work and is a fine way to start. The challenges you'll face are these:

1) Camera angle is a storytelling technique. Sometimes a changing emotion is partially expressed through a change in camera angle. When you have stock photos for your backgrounds, you're limited on being able to do this.

2) Similarly, sex scenes tend to work better in 3rd person than 1st. Especially kissing. The camera angle switch to 3rd person is harder with a photo background.

3) It's much harder to place the characters in the scene. Consider them sitting at a table where the table obscures their legs. Or, consider them having sex on the stairs while leaning over the railing. (The inability to do that particular one frustrated me when we were using photos.)

4) Shadows will never work. You won't be able to cast shadows onto the background, etc.

On the plus side, you don't have to buy a bunch of 3D buildings and sets, nor do you have to spend the time lighting them. I think you'd be totally fine doing photo backgrounds for your first game and work you way up to fully rendered stuff. It's kind of a "crawl, walk, run" concept. And it's MUCH better to finish a game with photo backgrounds than to get overwhelmed trying to do everything on your first try and maybe give up.

I'm glad to hear the expressions are working out for you.

Tlaero


I agree with all arguments, especially the shadows part, that I named light's coherence

There is alternatives another ways between buy scenarios and using photos. You can build simple environments using primitives, with a little of patience. There is a way to begin: https://turbofuture.com/graphic-design- ... DAZ-Studio

If you are planning to spend some dollars, I would advice you to buy textures that would help you in your creations. But even the textures can be made using a external images, like a draw on MSPaint or images from google.

lydia02 wrote:I realize I can save a scene and then add or delete lights based on results. What I was wondering is if it would be useful to create a default lighting setup? Or would different model location & backgrounds make the defaults pointless?


You can have default point lights positioned on candles or light bulbs, and vary some spotlights scene by scene only to give specific reinforcement in some places, like the face. Also you don't need to delete the object, you can just make invisible, in case you need to use again in other scene. Just press the eye symbol on the scene tab.

lydia02 wrote:Have been playing around with pov and a good view of her face plus expressions does really add to the look as tlareo shared. Only have expressions that came with the bundle sets so sorting through these to find some good ones. Thinking I'll pretty much stay on character as suggested unless there's a character spying on the girl in the shower. Then point of reference changes between spy and subject.


I recommend you only buy the basic expression bundle, like this one https://www.daz3d.com/genesis-8-male-expressions

I personally think that poses and expressions are bad ways to spend money, because you can achieve any pose or expressions on Pose tab. You can take a several minutes in the first time, but then is just save as pose preset and reuse latter
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Re: DAZ3D - Beginner Questions

Postby tlaero » Tue, 17Sep05 00:24

MaxCarna wrote:I recommend you only buy the basic expression bundle, like this one https://www.daz3d.com/genesis-8-male-expressions

I personally think that poses and expressions are bad ways to spend money, because you can achieve any pose or expressions on Pose tab. You can take a several minutes in the first time, but then is just save as pose preset and reuse latter


Yeah, the real trick to expressions is to look at yourself in the mirror making faces and seeing what happens. Humans are so attuned to facial expressions that we interpret them without really thinking about them. When happy, what do the eyebrows do? Etc. Your job as a visual artist is to really look at those expressions and figure out what makes them what they are. Then you'll be able to correctly replicate them in your models. Another option is to search on the web for "angry face photos" etc and study them.

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